Showing posts with label Bamboo Flute. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Bamboo Flute. Show all posts

Monday, November 21, 2016

How to Make a BAMBOO FLUTE For Homemade Music

Want to know how to make a bamboo flute for your own homemade music? Flute making with bamboo can be really simple, as most of the work is done for you by way of the natural hollows that are grown into the bamboo. However, there's just a little bit of math involved in figuring out how to make a flute the right length for the fundamental note (the lowest not that you can play, with all fingers covering every hole), and for how to make flute finger-hole placements precise, as well as the embouchure (blowing edge hole). The one, simple, all-important mathematical formula to do the job, is really very easy to understand. Allow me to show you...

Bansuri, a bamboo flute popular in India. The ...
Bansuri, a bamboo flute popular in India.
The picture shows a 23 inch long flute often used in concerts
 (Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)

To understand how to make a bamboo flute, you'll need to be aware of two basic numbers in flute making in order to make perfect homemade music. The numbers to know for how to make a flute with perfect tuning are; the linear measurement for how far sound travels per second, and; the number of Hertz (the vibratory frequency) of any particular notes you will have the flute play. But to correctly gage the sound, first we need to know how to make flute embouchures. For this example, we'll use a transverse (or "side-blown") flute. It's very simple - make the hole for this be about half the width of the bore diameter, and have the hole's center point be situated at one bore diameter's distance from the inside of the closed end. Bevel one edge on the inside at an acute angle for the best "airstream splitting edge".

Okay, now for the numbers and how to use them in making our bamboo flute, and superb homemade music. The distance sound travels per second, at sea level, and at about 70 degrees F (or 21 degrees C), is 13526.5 inches (or 34357.31 centimeters). Now you take the frequency number of the note, which for this example we'll say the fundamental note will be "A", which would be 440, and divide the previous number by this one. What you will get is the length of one wavelength for this note, in this case 30.74 inches, or 70.08 centimeters.



How to make a flute body the correct length for this is now to divide this measurement by two, which would make it about 15 3/8 inches, or 35.04 centimeters. You'll find that due to other factors in flute making, such as bore diameter and flute body wall thickness, you may need to shorten this a little bit more to get the note precisely - do this a little at a time. Use this same formula to find out how to make flute finger-hole placements along the length according to the notes you wish them to play, and there you have it!

    If you'd like to learn more about how to make a bamboo flute, flutes of various types and varieties, or any homemade instruments of woodwinds, percussion instruments or strings with precision, feel free visit my website on how to make your own music with professional quality homemade musical instruments that you can make yourself, at http://rockfreakinsolid.com - these ain't your children's paper plate tambourines, shoebox and rubber band guitars, or butter bucket drums!

    Article Directory: EzineArticles


Saturday, August 13, 2016

Japanese Zen Flute SHAKIHACHI - History, Information and Facts

The shakuhachi is a Japanese end-blown flute. It is the Japanese most well-known woodwind instrument. The shakuhachi flute (or also known as Zen flute) is used by Zen Buddhist as a tool for meditation as well as playing jazz, classical and traditional Japanese folk music. This flute is made from the very bottom of a bamboo tree, but versions now exist in ABS and hardwoods.

La fête de la musique 2014 au musée Guimet (Paris)

Although the bamboo flute is quite simple in appearance, but it is very difficult to play; its unique and magical quality is revealed to the listeners by the purity of its tone. In the hands of a master, the flute produces an extraordinary, subtle, sensual music – prized as being perfect for meditation and relaxation. Its beautiful, soulful sound made it popular in 80’s pop music in the English-speaking world.

The name shakuhachi is derived from the term “isshaku hassun” meaning one shaku and eight sun (1.8 Japanese feet). Usually the term shakuhachi refers to the standard size instrument, which is 54.5 cm in length, but it can also refer to many different sizes ranging from 1.3 – 2.5 shaku (39.4 – 75.7 cm) and longer. The shakuhachi is usually made from the root portion of a thick-walled bamboo (known as madake in Japanese).


There are two contrasting styles of making these instruments: the first involves using a style that is similar to the Zen Buddhist monks from the past. There is no filler in this shakuhachi and it is also sometimes called as ji nashi or hocchiku. If you look down the bore of a ji nashi, you can see some nodes of the bamboo protruding. While the second style has a filler made up of a certain mixture of ingredients, possibly including a powder called tonoko, lacquer or urushi and water. This is finished to create a polished surface.

Shakuhachi can be made in one piece (it is called as nobekan) or in two pieces with a middle joint (this also called as nakatsuki). Two of them has no difference in quality, only the two piece is easier to transport and often contains filler. The top part of shakuhachi is called utaguchi – literally ‘song mouth’, and this contain an insert made of various materials such as buffalo horn, ivory and plastic. Its shape is based on the preference of different schools.

Shakuhachi flute is possibly the simplest non-percussive instrument ever conceived. This instrument has no keys or pads like a western flute, no strings like a violin or guitar, no mechanism inside like organ or piano, no reed like a clarinet or saxophone, it does not even have a mouthpiece like the recorder. Zen flute has only five finger holes, which is fewer than the penny whistle or many other wind instrument. To play a note, your mouth and lips must become part of the instrument. Despite this simple construction, this instrument can produce an inconceivably broad range of musical sounds


The Zen flute came from China to Japan some time in the 6th century. The instrument was then adopted by a sect of Zen Buddhist monks around the 15th century. During this period, the flutes began to be made from the spiked root section of the bamboo – so the flute could double as a particularly ferocious weapon. That probably explains the flute’s long association with the martial arts.


By Susan Wong

Feng shui bamboo flutes
are used to ward off the bad chi whereas the lucky bamboo plants are used to attract wealth.
Article Source: EzineArticles



Tuesday, June 7, 2016

BAMBOO FLUTES

One of the many materials used to create the musical instruments known as flutes is bamboo. This is a tradition that stems back to the early generations of Australia and the Aborigines. The Chinese are also well known for using bamboo to create flutes but they are believed to have been directly influenced by those found in Australia.

a saluang (bamboo flute) from West-Sumatra
A saluang (bamboo flute) from West-Sumatra (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Each of the flutes was hand carved from sticks of bamboo and then holes were placed in them for the fingers. A location towards the top of it was for the person to blow air into. The way the fingers covered up the holes was what determined what sounds that the flute produced. This is very similar to what most people know as a recorder. Bamboo flutes can be good for children to learn on too before they move on to more advanced models.

Today you can buy bamboo flutes to play as well but you need to be patient in getting on. Each of them is made custom and it can take up to six months before you order will be processed. Yet you will end up with a flute that is original and that you can make music with. They are also very beautiful so you will want to display it when you can for others to see.

Most bamboo flutes don’t have all of the musical ranges with them though. You can get them custom made with particular keys in place though. The majority of bamboo flutes out there though are in D minor. They also feature seven holes for the fingers to cover. You will definitely notice a different sound coming from a bamboo flute though. It is a very low and deep sound that is interesting. It is quite different though from the soft sound you get with a nickel flute.

Bamboo flutes often run a couple of hundred dollars due to the amount of detail that goes into the workmanship. Many of them are imported from other countries too. You can find them online as well as listen to the various sounds they offer. For those that enjoy the flute this can be a great item to add to the mix.



Sunday, March 27, 2016

The Japanese BAMBOO FLUTE

Shakuhachi_player.jpg
Shakuhachi player (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
These days Japanese bamboo flutes or Shakuhachi flutes are used by a lot of practitioners of Zen Buddhism and meditation as well as for playing Jazz, Classical, Japanese folk music and improvisation. The soothing sound of the Japanese bamboo flute or Shakuhachi helps guide us, breath by breath, into a more relaxed and peaceful state of being, while gifting ourselves and others with the beauty of the unique sound.

The Shakuhachi bamboo flute is made from the very bottom of a bamboo tree, but versions now exist in ABS and hardwoods. The name shakuhachi is derived from the term "isshaku hassun" meaning one shaku and eight sun (1.8 Japanese feet). Generally the term shakuhachi refers to the standard size instrument, which is 54.5 cm in length, but it can also refer to many different sizes ranging from 1.3 - 2.5 shaku (39.4 - 75.7 cm) and longer. The shakuhachi is frequently made from the root portion of a thick-walled bamboo (known as madake in Japanese).

If you see a Japanese bamboo flute you can see that it looks simple in appearance. But, did you know that it is very difficult to play? If played by a master this bamboo flute can create amazing, subtle, sensual music - prized as being perfect for meditation and relaxation. It's beautiful, soulful sound is wonderful to listen to when you are taking a good rest or are relaxing or getting ready for sleep. If you are into Zen then having a Japanese bamboo flute can help you with your focus. The soothing sounds that the bamboo flute make create a calm feeling. Did you know that The Zen flute came from China to Japan sometime in the 6th century? The instrument was then adopted by a sect of Zen Buddhist monks around the 15th century. This fact definitely explains the bamboo flutes long relationship with martial arts.

If you are looking for an instrument for your energetic child to learn, look no further. The Shakuhachi will help calm you child's soul and give them focus and concentration. Imagine if your child took up the bamboo flute as one of their hobbies. Not only it is safe but at the same time your children will be musically inclined and be calmer and more focused because of their daily practice.
Another good thing about bamboo flutes is that you can buy them cheaply or you can make them at home. If you are going to make a homemade bamboo flute just make sure to have the right guidelines and information. You need to know the proper measurements, the holes and the exact length and weight of a good bamboo flute which you can find online. Get yourself a bamboo flute and have soothing and relaxing sounds anytime you want in your own home!