Showing posts with label Drum Sticks. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Drum Sticks. Show all posts

Monday, October 30, 2017

How to Pick Out Snare DRUM STICKS

English: A snare drum. Español: una caja orque...
A snare drum.  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Snare drum sticks are the objects that drummers hold and use to play the drums. Since there are different kinds of drums and styles of music, the sticks that drummers use to create their music can have a direct impact on the way they sound. As a result, it is important that drummers know the anatomy of a drumstick as well as how the characteristics of a drumstick can influence their sound.

Drumsticks can be made of many different types of materials but are usually made of wood. Common wood choices include hickory, oak, and hard maple. Each type of wood obtains unique characteristics that may make it more suitable in some musical situations than in others. Therefore, choosing the right wood for a performance is one key element to every drummer's unique tone.

Hickory tends to be the most popular wood used in drumsticks. It is denser, heavier and more rigid than the most types of wood allowing it to absorb a great amount of shock which helps reduce wrist and hand fatigue. Maple wood which is less dense and much lighter than hickory wood so it helps give the feel of a big stick without the extra weight of the hickory. Lastly, oak wood is very heavy and non-flexible causing the drumsticks made of oak to be some of the heaviest, hardest, and most durable drumsticks.

While the three types of wood mentioned above are the most common materials used to make drumsticks, other woods such as beech, hornbeam, lancewood, and massaranduba are also sources of snare drum sticks. It's important to note that sticks can also be made out of other materials including aluminum, plastic, and graphite, however, these are much rarer.

A snare drumstick has 4 basic parts but there will be 6 parts discussed in this article. First is the tip which is also known as the bead. It is located at the end part in which the head is being struck. It can be oval, round, acorn, or barrel-shaped. The shape of the bead can influence the way the stick rebounds off of the drum head after a stroke and is one of the most important aspects of a drumstick. Next is the neck of the drumstick. It is the small part of a snare drum stick that connects the tip to the shoulder. It is the thinnest part with the exception of some specialty drumsticks. The shoulder is the part where the stick starts to taper or slope into the neck. The closer the shoulder is to the tip, the less bounce and response you will get. The taper is used to identify the shape and the length of the drumstick shoulder. The shaft or the body is the biggest part of the stick which is used to hold and sometimes to produce specialty strokes. Lastly, the butt is the opposite of the tip which is the thicker, counterbalance end of the stick. Though it is not specifically designed as the part to play, some drummers flip the sticks to use butts for effects.



When picking out your first pair of snare drum sticks, be sure to consider the factors mentioned in this article. Determine what type of music you will be playing and decide what type of material will best fit that style of music. Next, determine what type of tip you want as well as what size drumstick best fits your hand. If you can feel confident making these decisions, you will have an easy time finding the perfect pair of sticks for your drumming experience!

    By Richard J. Klein
    Richard J. Klein is a passionate drummer and drum teacher who loves sharing his knowledge with people all around the world.
    Article Source: EzineArticles



Friday, January 27, 2017

STICK CONTROL - The Book Every Beginner Drummer Needs to Have!

The book "Stick Control: For the Snare Drummer" is one of the best books anyone can by for a beginner drummer to start out drumming with. This is the one book above everything else that I recommend to all of my students, friends, everybody! Without stick control and technique a person can never learn to properly play any kind of percussion instrument, especially when they are playing on a snare drum or a complete drum kit. If left uncorrected, poor stick technique can seriously injure a person and cause him to be be able to play drums any longer!

English: A snare drum. Español: una caja orque...
A snare drum.  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

"Stick Control: For the Snare Drummer" will teach you proper stick technique so you can become a faster and more controlled drummer. The only way to eventually play as fast as Travis Barker is to master your technique and control.

You will also learn drum rudiments, paradiddles, and other stick variations to increase your control far beyond what many beginner drummers ever come close to reaching!

This book does not just help drummers with their hand technique, but it also can be adapted to help improve your foot technique as well! Double-bass rhythms will become much easier to play and you will improve at a much faster rate than someone who is not using this book in their daily routine.

Overall, if you want to become a better drummer faster than other beginner drummers, "Stick Control: For the Snare Drummer" is were you start. Once you have it, you will use it until the day you die to warm up before gigs, concerts, recitals, anytime you play. This book is a must!

    Brent Hagy wants you to enjoy playing as much as he does and invites you to visit his webpage dedicated solely to beginner drummers so that you can start playing without spending a ton of money, some items are totally free! Start drumming, and have a blast!



Friday, June 10, 2016

How To Hold Your DRUMSTICK To Produce The Best Sound

The way you hold your drumsticks plays a vital role on the quality of sound that you produce and the length of time that you will be able to play your drums. Unfortunately, the proper holding of the drumsticks is one of the most ignored and neglected protocols when it comes to playing the drums. If you are one of those drummers who have not really been holding your drums, you will most like hurt yourself in the long run so start paying close attention to how you hold your drumsticks. Always remember that your drumsticks are extensions of your hands and not just an accessory that you use to hit the drums with.

Traditional Grip Detail
Traditional Grip Detail (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Gripping Your Sticks

If you are still a beginner and you still have not established a way of holding your drumsticks, it would be best for you to ask your music teacher to show you how to hold your drumsticks properly and practice that kind of grip. Learn the right way to hold your drumsticks right from the start. Always remember that unlearning something is a lot more difficult than learning something for the first time so make sure that you start your drumming lessons in the right direction.

Different people have different ways of gripping their drum sticks. The most common way of holding the drumsticks is the matched grip. The matched grip is very easy and is very popular especially among those drummers who are into pop music. When using the matched grip method of holding your drumsticks, you just simply hold both sticks in the same way with your palms facing downward. All your finger tips should rest lightly on the drumstick. The good thing about using the matched grip method of holding your drumsticks is that you can use the same gripping style when playing other instruments such as the timpani, chimes and other types of percussion instruments. 


Another popular way of holding the drumsticks is the traditional grip which allows you to hold your drumstick with your palms facing up with your fingers gripping the sticks from underneath. The traditional grip is very popular among jazz drummers because this allows better dynamic control. If you are aspiring to become a jazz drummer, it would be a good idea for you to practice holding your drumsticks in this manner from the very start so that you will be able to get the hang of it. However, if you have no plans on concentrating on jazz music, it would be best for you to use the matched grip. Note that if are using a bigger drum kit, the traditional grip may make it difficult for you to move around especially if you are using a bigger drum kit. You may find it quite awkward to hit your cymbals in this position.