Showing posts with label Guitar Playing. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Guitar Playing. Show all posts

Monday, September 18, 2017

GUITAR TIP: The Power Of Big Picture Thinking

What would you think about someone who wanted to become an awesome finger-picker but most of their practice was focused on using a pick? You'd think they were crazy right? And rightly so! But believe me, it's more common than you think. Heck...even I've been guilty of this more than a few times! I think we all sometimes fall into the trap of practicing things without thinking exactly WHY we are practicing them.

So what's the cure for this? I can give you the cure in three words...

English: Picture from playing guitar with guit...
Picture from playing guitar with guitar pick by Babak Babali (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Big Picture Thinking

What's this? Put simply it means looking at the WHYs and WHATs before looking at the HOWs. It's looking at the overall picture before becoming focused on the details. Let's take a look at an example to make it clearer...

Let's say that you would like to learn to shred. Rather than just jumping in and practicing some random exercises, let's go through the big picture thinking process.


**Step One** Why

In this step, you write down exactly WHY you want to become a shredder. Think of all the reasons and write them down. This is really important. Your reasons why help keeps you motivated and enthusiastic about working towards your goal. In fact, I can almost guarantee that without a strong, exciting and compelling why you will give up before you reach your goal!


**Step Two** Big Picture What

Write down WHAT you want to achieve. In this case, you would write down a detailed description of EXACTLY how you would like to play. What type of shredder do you want to become?


**Step Three** Detailed What

In this step, you'll write down the specific things that you will need to master in order to achieve what you wrote down in Step Two. Here are some example questions that you would ask yourself...

* What scales would I need to learn?

* What songs would I like to learn?

* What techniques would I have to master?

* What guitar tutors who live near to me teach shredding?

* What licks and exercises would help me achieve my goal?

* What instructional books, videos or DVDs will I need to buy?

The aim of this step is to get a detailed list of SPECIFIC things that you need to master in order to reach your goal.




**Step Four** How

This is where you write down a detailed practice schedule. This schedule will help you systematically learn what you wrote down in the previous step. If you're not sure how to put together an effective practice schedule then you may want to hire a good guitar tutor.

Can you see how this works? Rather than just jumping in and practicing, you start with the big picture first then work your way down to the small details.I guarantee that doing it this way will speed up your progress drastically. The main reason why is you will only be practicing things 100% related to your guitar goals.




Thursday, August 10, 2017

Your Personal Tone Generator

A guide to getting a sound and trouble shooting

English: This is Rogelio Rivas trying to learn...
This is Rogelio Rivas trying to learn his guitar lessons. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
A good sound starts from the fingers, through the pick-up to the guitar and out. If you don’t start there, you’re spinning in circles and end up with a transparent (fuzzy) sound without body and response. “Your fingers are your tone generators”. Not the amps or pedals. Those are tools to augment your expression. That’s what guitar lessons teach you, not teaching you a song without teaching you, and guiding you in technique.

And, if you learn a thing or two about trouble shooting “on the fly”, you’ll go down the line to find the problem with your rig. The same goes for finding your sound. When establishing your sound you start with your technique, through the pick-up on down to the amp. With trouble shooting on stage, you should start with the amp and go down the line back to you, which make’s sense. Since you’ve established your rig set up. As you’re trying to fix what was working, you back track. 

This saves time and controls moods, besides the over all situation’s under control. Then, if and when you need to use a stage tech, you’ll have a template in which to explain what it is you require from the person “you” hire. There’s nothing more frustrating than hiring someone, that has no idea what it is you need or want. Imagine working for someone without a clue. A band leader who expects you to read his mind? Communication starts with a plan.

Good luck and sound good, where ever your muse takes you, find a clue.

Stay in touch for a more in depth study of the elusive art of tone. Whose tone is good? Someday maybe I’ll be able to dial in someone else’s tone and tell you for sure what the deal is!!! RIGHT……. It’s all subjective!


Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Make a Game of Your GUITAR PRACTICE and Surprise Yourself

So you want to be improve your guitar playing?

Well, like any thing, guitar skill progress takes time and practice, but many of us have much difficulty practicing regularly because it is so easy to let other things take priority over our guitar lessons.

Broke the guitar out today. She hit for the cy...
Broke the guitar out today. She hit for the cycle on music - recorder, piano, and guitar. Nice. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
First, you need to absolutely make up your mind that you want to improve your guitar playing and then make sure that your progress is truly is a priority for you.

Make a list of the most important things that you need to focus on in your life right now and honestly assess where guitar fits into your list.

Ideally, you want to be engaged in a guitar lesson for at least an hour a day in order to make any significant progress.

However, you may have to conclude that at this point you are not going to be able to devote even an hour a week to the task.

If that is the case, try to spend some casual time reading guitar-related publications or listening to your favorite guitarists to nurture your love of the music.  When your priorities change and you have more time, you will then at least still have a strong interest in becoming as good a guitarist as you can.  Listening to Eric Clapton or other greats will only kindle your interest and may even cause you to reprioritize your guitar lessons.

Once you see where your guitar practice fits in with the rest of your life, make a true appointment with yourself.  Put your practice into your schedule.  Get it in your planner or it won't get done!
Okay, now that you are regularly spending time with your beloved guitar, what should you do?
First, make sure it is quality time.  Don't have the television on or be hanging out with friends. Then, make sure you are working on skills that you need to sharpen.

If you spend time strumming popular solos and cranking up your amplifier, you may have some fun, but you will not improve your skills.

Think about the chords and scales that you struggle with.  Grade yourself on them on a scale (no pun intended) of 1 to 10 and then re-evaluate every week or so.  Re-grading every practice or guitar lesson is not appropriate because it is unfair to measure progress that frequently.

No one improves in a straight line.  You may hit a certain chord great one day and then have two of the strings sound very unclear the next day.  However, if you work diligently you will make progress when measured every couple weeks or so.

Do the same thing with scales and even notes depending on your current skill level.

Once you have a way of measuring your progress, you will be inspired to continue with your regular practice regimen and guitar lessons.

As an advanced step, after you have made progress with a certain group of chords and scales, you should find a song you like that uses many of those elements and work on that as a way of applying your improved ability.

This can be very rewarding.

You may even want to start with the song and work backwards, but make sure that you do spend a great deal of time on the fundamentals before you get serious about the song.

The key to all this is regular consistent work and a measurement of results.  Achieve this, and you will enjoy your practice time more and more.  Challenge yourself to be at a certain grade by a specific time.

Make a game of your practice efforts and you will surprise yourself!

Author: Jeremiah Thompson




Sunday, January 29, 2017

GUITAR Greats

No two guitar aficionados will be able to agree on the list of guitar greats, but like so many lists, it can be fun to try to make. What each considers greatness will vary too - is it technical ability or some hard-to-define quality like 'soul'?

Jimi Hendrix NEW
Jimi Hendrix  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The blues guitarist Robert Johnson features on many lists. He has the added attraction of a shadowy legend all his own. The story goes that he was a pretty average, even bad guitarist, but in just one year he became phenomenal... Where had this new talent come from? Nobody wanted to believe it was just practice and hard work, so the tale started that Johnson had made a pact with the Devil. 

The deal had been done, so the story goes, at a crossroads somewhere in the Deep South. Johnson himself immortalized the meetings, probably ironically, in songs like Crossroad Blues and Me And The Devil Blues. These were some of the few tracks he was able to record before his death in 1938 at the tender age of 27. To this day no one knows if he was stabbed or poisoned or if the devil himself came to claim what he was owed. 

A tragically young death isn't essential to become a guitar great, but another man who makes most lists also died aged only 28. Jimi Hendrix took guitar playing to an entire new level of showmanship. But sometimes people remember the antics - playing solos behind his back or with his teeth, setting his guitar on fire (an idea which owes a lot to Jerry Lee Lewis) - and forget how fantastic he was as a musician. 

Hendrix was an all-round musician, equally adept at blues, rock and jazz. Believe it or not, he only had a bassist and drummer in his live concerts. He was a great exponent of playing guitar and very innovative as well. Being left handed, he re strung his guitar upside down. 

All legends have lots of controversies associated with them and Hendrix was no exception. He has been blamed for covering other bands songs in concert and on record. Once he did the Beatles 'Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Heart's Club It is believed that he could play a song after listening to it for just once. He is also credit to have pleased the stubborn Miles Davis with his music. 

Guitar players rule the roost in many forms of music. People do not view them only as rock or blues man. That is why Django Rheinhardt, John Williams and Paco de Lucia are considered universally great. No doubt complete agreement on guitar legends cannot be achieved.

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

6 Simple Steps to Becoming A HOT GUITAR PLAYER!

Learning how to play guitar well is not easy. There are so many methods and so many conflicting opinions, it makes it difficult to know what to do.

But the simple fact is, if you want to be the best you can, as soon as you can, then all you need to do is - copy what the pro's do...

Master the Basics!
Mastering the basics means being able to play in all keys. Being able to transpose any song to any other key - on the spot preferably.

English: Circle of fifths Italiano: Circolo de...
Circle of fifths (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Did you know that 95% of guitarists DON'T master the basics. Oh yes, they mean to get around to it, but they hardly ever do.

Why is that? Well, it's because they think it's boring, complicated and too much hard work. And most of all - no fun! And mostly they were right. Well, it needn't be that way. Mastering the basics can be a lot of fun if you go about it in a methodical set-by-step way.

What does mastering the basics entail?

There are 6 basic steps you need to follow:
1. Learn the names of all notes on all strings, one string at a time.
2. Learn how to construct a C Major scale.
Basic must-know guitar theory. Easy stuff.
3. Learn how the chords of the major scale are made and what they are... their names etc. C Dm Em F G Am Bdim.
Basic chord construction knowledge.
4. Learn the triad patterns for the C major scale all over the fret board.
Triads are simple 3-note chords. Easy and fun to learn and play.
5. Learn to play those triads with common chord progressions.
Learn to play and apply the triads to the most common chord progressions that fit thousands and thousands of songs.
6. Learn to do step 5 in all keys.
Once you can do steps one to five in the key of C, it's real easy to learn it for the other 11 major keys.
Hint: It's much easier than you think. All the patterns are exactly the same as what you learn for C major. You don't have to learn any new patterns. Cookie cutter stuff.

It really is not hard at all. All you need is a methodical step-by-step method that makes sense and is easy and fun to use

About The Author

John Bilderbeck is a professional guitar teacher and his step-by-step Master the Basics eBook course is free when you join his website.
Claim your copy now - visit:http//www.free-guitar-chords.com

Source: Articlecity


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