Showing posts with label Saxophone. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Saxophone. Show all posts

Sunday, May 6, 2018

DENTISTRY and the MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS You Play

oboe performance
Oboe Player - Photo by liberalmind1012 
Before your child starts playing a kind of musical instrument, particularly a wind instrument such as a clarinet or saxophone, a New York orthodontist strongly recommends that you check first with your dentist. The dentist said that faulty alignment of teeth and gum difficulties are among the dental problems that certain individuals have because of the instruments that they play. He said in a report published in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association that millions of American children are playing some kind of instruments they selected themselves or are studying music in schools using instruments that may have been assigned to them on a haphazard basis.

There are just certain instruments that are not suited for children dentally or temperamentally, and this would be later on discovered by the children. Many would be a musician is handicapped from the start and will never be any more than mediocre in his field. Dentists who want to provide good service for their patients must remember to tell would be musicians, music teachers, and parents that some dental problems are caused by the playing of wind instruments.

Before the parents invest time, effort, and money to this musical pursuit, a dental consultation should be done first. There are a lot of dentists who claim that single reed instruments are usually to blame for cases of body tissue illnesses experienced by wind instrumentalists. The lower lip is supported by the teeth, and unfortunately, it is also here that a lot of weight from the instrument is applied. Applying pressure on the teeth reduces the blood circulation in the affected bone area.

The upper teeth may also be misaligned due to the pressure exerted by the lower jaw onto the upper teeth. Compression of the lips against the upper and lower teeth is the result of playing brass instruments like a trumpet. Tooth mobility may come as a result of playing these instruments for extended periods of time. A short upper lip prevents a person from playing the flute well and comfortably, while irregular teeth cause a person's lips to hurt while he is playing the oboe or bassoon.

Dental problems may arise because of string instruments also. Certain studies indicate that faulty bite is a common problem of violinists since a lot of pressure is put on their jaw when they play. These dental problems can be prevented if an oral examination is given to would be musicians. Proper early recommendations can ensure dental suitability and oral health so that a would-be musician is not needlessly handicapped in playing his or her favorite musical instruments, he said.

Getting check-ups before anything else is definitely a great way to make sure you don't get complications in the latter stages of life. Seeing your dentist beforehand is especially true when it comes to playing wind instruments. Seeing a dentist is never a bad thing.

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Tuesday, February 27, 2018

LENNY PICKETT TENOR SAXOPHONE Virtuoso

Yes, that's the great Lenny Pickett next to Chester Thompson for "Squib Cakes"!
Photo  by Ethan Prater 
Lenny Pickett is best known as the tenor saxophonist of the Saturday Night Live Band, he is one of the virtuosos of altissimo saxophone. The altissimo register is a technique that almost seems like a requirement for saxophonists today. It's based on harmonics and enables you to achieve notes above the normal range of the saxophone.

For example, it is possible to finger a low Bb (the lowest note on the instrument) and by changing the embouchure and air stream to blow the full overtone series of the low Bb (middle Bb, middle F, high Bb, high D, high F, and so on.) This technique can be heard clearly in the well-known opening theme to Saturday Night Live.

Lenny passes says this about his equipment, in response to numerous inquiries:  "I play a Selmer Paris Mark VI tenor (circa 1970) with a Berg Larsen 130 over 0 (SMS) mouthpiece and a number 3 Vandoren (blue box) bass clarinet reed."

Pickett, born in New Mexico in 1954, is competent not only with saxophone but also on flute and clarinet. After dropping out of high school in Berkeley, he spent a brief period studying under Bert Wilson, but amazingly, other than that instruction is entirely self-taught on the saxophone. Not viewed as a traditional jazz player, he is best showcased in short bursts of color bringing the life of his horn to center stage in R&B and rock arrangements. He is well known for his funky style, and his ability to make the sax "scream."



Pickett played with the Tower of Power horns from 1972 to 1981 and toured the world with them. Tower of Power still tours extensively today, though without Pickett. They released multiple Top 100 albums over the course of Pickett's career with them. Tower of Power played in many styles, from soul to funk to disco, and Pickett's virtuoso playing felt at home in all of them.

Tower of Power's horns section has performed with a variety of other artists including Santana, Heart, Poison, Phish, and more. He has since performed live and recorded with Rod Stewart, Elton John, Little Feat, Peter Gordon's Love of Life Orchestra, Doc Kupka's Strokeland Superband, and many rock and jazz albums and film and television soundtracks. Pickett's management's bio describes his music as "polyphonic extravaganzas which manage to touch base with R&B, funk, swing, Latin influence, and the avant-garde; horn lines twist around one another, shifting and building in intensity."

He has worked as a saxophonist and arranger for David Bowie, the Talking heads, and Laurie Anderson. As a composer, he has been commissioned to write works mixing classical and popular ideas for a variety of ensembles including the New Century Saxophone Quartet. Due to his strange and wild self-taught style, his techniques are endlessly discussed on Internet forums, where players speculate on his fingering, whether or not he's using double or triple tonguing, often asking each other "What is Pickett doing?!??!"

He is currently a professor of jazz saxophone at New York University.

    Author: Neal Battaglia 
     Are you into sax improvisation? Learn more about Saxophone Improv at Sax Station! 


Friday, February 23, 2018

Learning to Play SAXOPHONE - About the Instrument

Bell Of A Selmer Mark Vi Alto Saxophone Within...
Bell Of A Selmer Mark Vi Alto Saxophone  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Saxophone, one of the best instruments to learn (in my opinion)! You will soon come to find that playing the saxophone is not only fun, but it also teaches discipline and the sense of achievement are priceless.

Note about Equipment
Some sax players spend an inordinate amount of time thinking about equipment...
Tiger Woods would still beat you at golf if he used crappy clubs.
But maybe not if he used a baseball bat and a volleyball.

So have to make sure your saxophone, mouthpiece, reeds, etc are functioning. But DO NOT spend more time worrying about your equipment than actually playing & practicing.

The saxophone itself has a body and a neck. The mouthpiece goes around the neck and has a reed held on by a ligature. The mouthpiece, reeds, and ligature matter sometimes more than the horn itself.

Saxophone Reeds
The reed makes the sound in your saxophone through its vibration.
Saxophone reeds are made of a special cane that grows in only a few parts of the world. It is expensive and wears out in a few weeks. There are synthetic alternatives, but they don't sound as good.
Start with a softer reed (lower number). And you'll also want a softer reed if you have a mouthpiece that is more open. Beginners can start with number 2 and experiment from there.

Saxophone Mouthpiece
The basic idea of mouthpiece position on a sax is that pushing the mouthpiece farther down on the cork will make your intonation higher while pulling it out will make your intonation lower.
To quote Jimmy Haag, "You are basically playing a long tube when you play a saxophone. A saxophone is all about the speed of the air like any wind instrument. The length of the tube determines its harmonics. Since EVERYONE has a different throat, mouth, teeth, and tongue, it is a truly individual journey to find out what works for you. I meet a lot of people who are looking for a standard but in fact, there is only one way that will work for you."

So it's not as simple as pushing the mouthpiece on farther or pulling it out more.
The temperature and the environment affect intonation too- if it's hot outside the air will move faster and the sax will be sharper if its cold- it will tend to be flat.

And a saxophone in tune on one note will not necessarily be in tune on another note, if not adjustments are made by the player. With practice, you'll develop control and these things will happen subconsciously.

Ligature
The ligature holds the reed on the saxophone mouthpiece. It makes some differences. But you probably don't need to spend ridiculous amounts of money on a diamond-encrusted ligature.


Saxophone
There are four 'big' brands of saxophone:
Selmer, Keilwerth, Yamaha, and Yanagisawa.
They all make professional horns.
The Selmer Mark VI is the most famous type of saxophone, they stopped making them so the Mark VI's can be very pricey these days. But many professionals swear by them. Not every Mark VI is still in great condition though.

There are some other brands that make decent horns. Be careful if they are imported and have soft metal. And try them out before you buy them.

Saxophones have features such as rolled tone holes and a high F# key. In general, many of the advancements in instrument making have been adopted by most saxophone companies.

Types of Saxophone
When you're starting off, play an alto or tenor. Alto's a bit smaller and easier for a child to carry.
Soprano is smaller than alto, but its tone is harder to control.
And baritone is larger than tenor.
The tenor saxophone is what most famous saxophone players favor although some preferred alto and there are a handful of saxophone players who mostly play soprano or bari.

Musicality!
Remember that you need to play music on your saxophone, not just have nice equipment.
A bad driver in a Ferrari is not impressive.
Sometimes problems you have with playing are actually because of the instrument, reed, etc. But more times they are not.




Saturday, October 14, 2017

Tuning, Intonation, And The SAXOPHONE

sax gal in the house
Photo  by woodleywonderworks 
Playing your saxophone in tune with others in your band requires much more than simply playing a reference note into a tuner and adjusting the mouthpiece on the instrument. In order to really understand the tuning process and how best to tune your saxophone, it helps to know the physics behind the sound that you produce while playing. When we are talking about physics and the saxophone we are dealing in the realm of invisible vibrations called sound waves.

To better understand these sound waves it helps to think about a guitar string. When you pluck a note on a guitar the string vibrates at a specific rate or "frequency." The length of this string dictates what frequency the string will vibrate at. By moving your finger up and down the fretboard you can change the pitch to any of a dozen or so pitches. Now think about a fretless guitar. Instead of a dozen pitches, you could potentially have hundreds of pitches, each very slightly different than the other. Saxophones behave in this same way but use a vibrating column of air instead of a vibrating string.

When you add or subtract fingers on the saxophone you are changing the overall length of the tube, creating shorter or longer sound waves in the process. Many things can affect this resultant wave. A key that is not adjusted properly can partially close over an open hole causing all notes above that key to be slightly flat. Likewise, a key that is left open when it should be closed can make other notes out of tune or at the very least sound less focused.

Two saxophones that are not perfectly tuned to each other will always vibrate at different frequencies even when playing the same note. When two sound waves of the exact same frequency are played together they reinforce each other creating a stronger, more pleasing overall sound. When two pitches are slightly out of tune they occasionally collide with each other causing a disturbance in the combined waveform. This phenomenon creates audible "beats" or bumps in what the listener hears. Each bump in the combined sound is literally the two sound waves slamming into each other. It is often easier to understand this process by seeing it visually. Take a look at the examples shown at http://library.thinkquest.org/19537/Physics.html.


As a saxophone player, it should be your goal to learn how to play your instrument in perfect tune. Unfortunately, this requires more than simply tuning your concert A or B-flat. Now that you know a little about the physics of sound, however, you can begin to understand the inherent pitch problems of your saxophone and relate this to your overall performance and study routine.




Friday, October 6, 2017

What You Should Know About Buying A Sax And A MOUTHPIECE

Hammer365: 072/293 A Distant Past
Photo  by David Reber’s Hammer Photography 
Playing music would definitely give you a lot of things to enjoy. It would let you express yourself. It would be a means of also releasing the stress and tension that you feel. When you play music, creativity would also flow. That is why it would be worthwhile to learn how to play an instrument. If you are a fan of jazz and blues, it would be actually great if you learn how to play the sax. This instrument can be found from various sources. It is also crucial that you choose the right denis wick mouthpieces for your instrument. Learn then more about these things and how you can choose one.

It is very important that you know how to choose the right sax. You can choose to either buy something new or something secondhand or vintage. It would be good to buy something new especially if you are still starting and do not have much idea about vintage pieces just yet. However, if you want to make savings, you can choose to buy secondhand ones.

One can also choose to have good vintage saxophones if they want. This is more of a choice for those who are already familiar with the instrument and adept in its quality and playing. It would be a great choice as you may actually save money. You can also choose this if you want to play saxophone that is rare and has greatly appreciated value over time.

The first step that you would need to do before the actual buying would be to do research. Get to know about each piece and model in advance. The materials which make the instrument and the specifications of each model will be real of importance.

Before you buy, you need to ascertain the conditions of the instrument. If this is a secondhand piece, buy only those in mint conditions or those needing only very minor repairs. It is not wise to spend more on the repairs than the actual piece.


Listening to the instrument is also important. You would have to listen to how it sounds. This will be the best way of checking the quality.
Use the right denis wick mouthpieces as well. You should check the baffles, sidewalls, chambers, and rails. Check also the quality and form of the reed and facing table.

Always have these things in mind. They would be of great help to you. You can then find the best sax and mouthpiece that would suit your needs.



Thursday, August 31, 2017

SAXOPHONES, Jazz Musicians, and the Influence of Inner Personal Conflicts

Saxophones, in comparison to many other instruments, do not have a very long history. The first one was designed around 1840 by a Belgian named Adolphe Sax in an attempt to improve the sound of the clarinet. Adolphe planned the saxophones as a family of instruments ranging in size from the sopranino, soprano, alto, tenor, baritone, bass, contrabass, and sub-contrabass. Saxophones were first introduced into a musical score in 1844 by Jean-George Kastner. Saxophones were initially used in symphonies, military bands, and chamber music, then in big bands, and in the 1920's saxophones were incorporated into jazz music.

DSC_5884
Saxophone Music - Photo  by  screen-box.de 
Jazz music began it's infiltration into American music in March 1917. The principal instruments used included the trumpet, cornet, slide trombone, valve trombone, French horn, baritone, clarinet, family of saxophones, percussion, string bass, and piano. When members of the Original Dixieland Jazz Band were recording their music in a New York studio, they were instructed to play faster in order to fit the whole song on a record. This exciting, lively, assertive, rowdy, and bold music is what caught the attention of everyone's listening ears. It was a time when America was hard at work and needed an outlet, a way to play. They grasped this new style with full force and made jazz a favorite pastime.

Although this seemed like new music, it was not totally new in the truest sense of the word. It involves taking apart an already established song and then putting it back together in a novel way. Jazz also involves, to a large extent, the component of improvisation in order to interpret the melody or harmony in a fresh way. Playing jazz involves elements of spontaneity, spirit, creativity, and rhythmic drive. As stated by Gary Giddins, "It's the ultimate in rugged individualism. It's going out there on that stage and saying: It doesn't matter how anybody else did it. This is the way I'm going to do it." Jazz allows the expression of a full range of emotions with whichever instrument the musician is using.

Clearly, one of the most expressive instruments in this type of music are saxophones with their ability to squeal, laugh, shriek, and whisper. Saxophones are able to release the inner voice, the feelings, the inner personality of the musician playing them. Not only is jazz music an outlet for those listening to it, but also for the musicians playing the music with their saxophones. Certainly what wasn't able to be said in words was often verbalized musically whether through a soulful lament or a happy energetic, playful sound, especially with the tenor, alto, or soprano saxophones.


This means of expression is portrayed in the music of not only the early innovators of swing, but also in bebop, hard bop, jazz, free jazz, and electric jazz/rock/funk. Some of the best and most renowned music came from those musicians with the most difficult inner personal conflicts. It seems though that those with the most troubled lives had the most inner drive to make their music as brilliant as possible.


    This author is a saxophonist, novice pianist, and novice guitarist. In addition, she is an occupational therapist who works with a host of disabilities utilizing sensory integration and neurodevelopmental therapy in combination with music and a variety of other techniques to assist these persons in achieving the highest level of function and quality of life possible.
    Article Directory: EzineArticles


Saturday, August 19, 2017

TENOR SAXOPHONE: Some Basic Techniques and Knowledge

If you're interested in learning how to play tenor saxophone, there's much to learn and much to practice. So, here we would like to share some important tips for learning and mastering the incredibly expressive musical instrument that is that tenor saxophone.

It's important to touch upon the various basic effects that you should be aware of and practice on your tenor saxophone. With these effects under your hat, your playing will be far more adept, musical, and varied. You will also be able to use these effects in your own unique combination so that you can forge your own personal, distinct style of tenor saxophone playing.

Mick Nock[p] Phil Slater (trt), Karl Laskowski (tr sax), Ben Waples (bs) James Waples (dms)
Tenor Saxophone - Photo  by   PeterTea 
Flutter Tongue: This is a Growling-like effect that is produced with the tongue. Achieved by placing the tongue very lightly on or close to the roof of the mouth and breathing out heavily through the mouth while blowing.

  • Growling: Achieve this by humming while at once blowing.
  • Honking: Use this effect to make your tenor sax honk just like a goose.
  • Note Bending: Heavily used in jazz and blues playing, bending means you sharpen a sustained note after sounding it non-sharped or even flatted. When you become quite advanced you can also start a note sharp and then bend it down in pitch.
  • Slap-tongue: This produces a popping sound.
  • Slurring: Fluidly playing up or down a scale without pause.
  • Tonguing: With this technique, you use your tongue to touch the reed between notes. By putting your tongue on the edge of the reed in between notes, you make the reed cease from making a sound, and this forces a rhythmic break between the notes that you're playing.
  • Trilling: This is a fingering technique-effect. Begin on one note and then rapidly and repeatedly move back and forth between that note and the next one either higher or lower while sustaining your blowing. (Very advanced tenor saxophone players can do Trilling independently of using this fingering method.)
  • Vibrato: This brings more depth and color to the note that you're sounding. You should start with the Lip Method and then, once you are more advanced, you can use the more difficult and more subtly expressive Diaphragm Method.

The tenor saxophone is the second most widely played sax in the music world. Exemplars of great virtuosity on the tenor sax include Plas Johnson and Stan Getz. The saxophone is associated with jazz, blues, and some subgenres of rock music, however, it actually began as a classical orchestra instrument, and it's possible to find recordings of classical music making use of the saxophone.



But in addition to learning the effects listed above and listening to tenor saxophone greats to pick up inspiration, in order to play great tenor saxophone [http://www.thebestsaxophones.com/] you need to buy yourself a quality tenor sax. But a quality tenor sax doesn't need to be overly expensive, especially if you are first learning. And yet, you don't want to get a cheap tenor sax that will easily corrode or break, or which won't yield a fulfilling sound. Choose your tenor sax carefully to strike the perfect balance between affordability and quality.



Friday, August 18, 2017

How Much Can A SAXOPHONE Cost

Adolphe Sax (1814-1894), inventor of the saxophone
Adolphe Sax (1814-1894),
inventor of the saxophone
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)
A brass instrument with the characteristics that are similar to woodwind instruments. It shares a number of similarities with the clarinet. A Belgian born instrument maker, Adolphe Sax, invented the saxophone in 1846. There are four different types of available in the world today, alto, tenor, soprano and baritone. All of these have different characteristics that make them unique. The price range of new sax can vary widely, based on:

• Manufacturer: The price range depends highly on the brand or manufacturer. There are a number of famous brands known for manufacturing high quality instruments. Yamaha and Selmer are top saxophone brands. These may be expensive but they are the standards against which all other brands are measured. Yamaha, regardless of the type, range between $1300 and $4000. Selmer sax, on the other hand, are slightly more expensive. Their price ranges between $2000 and $7500. Yanagisawa and Keilwerth are also known brands. You can buy their saxophones at reasonable prices.

• Type of saxophone: the four different types of saxophones have varying prices. An alto may be purchased for as low as $200 but the quality would not be very good. An expensive alto sax ranges from $4000 to $8000. An inexpensive tenor can be bought for $300, whereas the expensive ones cost about $6000. Soprano saxophones also range between $300 and $6000. Baritones are the most expensive type. Their price may be as low as $1000 or as high as $12000.

• Material: the prices of saxophones are also dependent on the material that is used in their manufacturing. Although, saxophones are brass instruments, they can be made of a number of materials. Various manufacturers have tried using diverse materials in the manufacturing of saxophones. The most common saxophones are made of brass and their price ranges between $200 and $7000. Other saxophones made of materials like stainless steel, bronze and polycarbonate can be purchased within the same price range as well. Saxophones that have silver or gold plating have a much higher price range.

If you do not want to buy a new saxophone due to monetary limitations, you can always look for good deals for used saxophones. Although, there is no guarantee that used saxophones will be worth your money, you can always buy cautiously and get the best option available. Moreover, you can find various websites that have new saxophones for sale at reasonable prices. It is recommended for beginners and students to try their hand on a less expensive saxophone. Professionals, however, should always buy high quality branded saxophones. The price of the saxophone can also vary if accessories like saxophone case and neck strap are bought along with the instrument.






Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Rock and Roll SAXOPHONE

By the 1940's the saxophone was a well established and very popular instrument in both classical and jazz music. As the 40's brought more musical styles like jump blues, rhythm and blues and rock and roll the instrument would become even more important and play a major roll in the new sound.

King Curtis.png

Illinios Jacqeut was a very good swing jazz player and like many others, he was drawn to the new sounds. He was only19 years old when he worked with Lionel Hampton's band and recorded his famous solo that started others honkin' and screaming' to start the beginning of the rock and roll saxophone.

One kid he inspired was Big Jay McNeely who took the honkin' over the edge and made a show of it... laying on his back, strolling into the crowds and walking on top of bars. (That's where the term "honkers and bar walkers" came from. That's a good cd compilation series featuring other rock and roll saxophonists)

Ahh... those crazy kids. This was a new generation, born in the 20's right around the time Louis Armstrong and Coleman Hawkins were coming on the scene. They probably thought these guys were nuts, but they fuelled the bands and drove the audience crazy with their energy.

Honkin' and screamin' aside, the saxophone, especially the tenor was sounding big and raunchy like never before. Guys were growling more and making it squawk and really wailin'. The honkin' was a fad that passed quickly but it helped to take the sax to another level of popularity, The rock and roll saxophone sound was now mandatory in all the jump, R&B, and rock and roll bands.

This new sound of the 40's rhythm and blues produced many rock and roll saxophone stars. Besides the ones I mentioned above, here are a few others; Joe Houston, Red Prysock, Sam "the man" Taylor, Lee Allen, Willis "gatortail" Jackson, Louis Jordan and King Curtis.

"Tenor battles" were popular as soon as you had a couple greats at any given time, like Coleman Hawkins with Lester Young, or Red Prysock with Sil Austin, and two of my favorites Sam Taylor with King Curtis.

Most of these guys were coming from the swing scene as well but were involved with their own R&B / rock and roll groups or were sidemen to star singers like Little Richard, Fats Domino, Wynonie Harris, and Ray Charles.



Without a doubt, one of the most influential for us guys playing any kind of rock and roll saxophone today is King Curtis, who came onto the New York scene shortly after the rock and roll movement got into full swing in the mid 50's. Of course you've heard his sax on many hit records from Aretha Franklin to The Coasters and he had many of his own as well in the 60's.

Unfortunately he was killed tragically at a young age. For me, his was the quintessential rock and roll saxophone

Rock on JF



Tuesday, July 4, 2017

BARITON SAXOPHONE - Music-Instruments of the World

Bariton Saxophone - Music-Instruments of the World



Monday, July 3, 2017

CHARLIE PARKER Bio Alto SAXOPHONIST Legend

Alto saxophonist Charlie Parker was one of the most influential jazz musicians of all time. Known also as Yardbird, or simply Bird, Charlie was an early bebop pioneer; many of his songs remain standards to this day.

It might surprise you, but Charlie Parker started playing the saxophone at age 11, but wasn't a child prodigy by any stretch of the imagination. He joined the school band at age 14, and by one account, was kicked out because of his bad playing as a result of his lack of formal training. Charlie didn't let setbacks bother him though, and an in interview once said that for three to four years he practiced 15 hours a day. Part of this practice regime included playing the blues songs he learned in all 12 keys. During this time, Parker's improvisational skill flourished, and he began to develop some of the musical ideas that would give birth to bebop.

Charlie Parker, Tommy Potter, Miles Davis, Max Roach (Gottlieb 06941).jpg



In the late thirties, Charlie played with local jazz bands in the Kansas City area. Ensembles led by Count Basie and Bennie Moten were popular in the area around this time and influenced Charlie's playing. By 1938 Charlie Parker had joined pianist Jay McShann's band, Jay McShann's Territory Band. The band played all over the southwest and occasionally travelled to bigger markets such as Chicago and New York.

It was with Jay McShann that Parker would play on his first professional recording. Bird moved to New York in 1939 and took a job as a dishwasher at Jimmy's Chicken Shack to supplement the income he made with Jay McShann's Territory Band. Pianist Art Tatum frequently played at the venue and his use of fast paced arpeggios would have an influence of Parker's playing.

In 1942 Charlie Parker left Jay's band to play with Earl Hines' band. A band that included Dizzy Gillespie on trumpet. A musician's strike from 1942-1943 has made it difficult to document much of what happened during that period. We do know, however, that in that year Paker played with a group of young musicians who embraced the new bebop form of jazz. This group of musicians included not only Parker and Gillespie but other soon to be legends, such as Thelonious Monk, Charlie Christian and Kenny Clarke.



During these formative years of the genre, most of the older, established jazz musicians did not embrace it. Some, however, such as Coleman Hawkins and Benny Goodman, appreciated the new art form, playing and recording with bebop stylists. The genre which Charlie Parker all but invented, had arrived.

Charlie was famous for showing up to gigs without an instrument and borrowing one from somebody else at the last minute. For this reason, he could be seen playing many different makes and models of sax. These include Conn 6Ms, Selmer model 22s, and 26s, and even a Grafton plastic saxophone. In 1947 he had a King Super 20 made exclusively for him. He seemed to prefer Brilhart mouthpieces, having used both Ebolin and Tonalin Streamlines. According to rumor he used hard Rico reeds early in his career but later switched to a 2 ½ in the fifties.



Friday, May 26, 2017

Repetitive STRAIN INJURY in Musicians and Especially SAXOPHONEPlayers

Sadly musicians have an increased risk of developing repetitive strain injury. Many factors contribute to this including less than ergonomic instrument design, high stress levels when performing and relentless lengthy practice sessions. My first piece of advice to any musician who thinks they've developed repetitive strain injury is don't panic! Whilst this infliction can be physically very painful and mentally crushing, it is a sign from your body that change is required. With the right energy and commitment the healing process can be a time of positive reflection and will only serve to benefit you in the long run.

Cantigas musicians
Cantigas musicians (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
There are many more problems causing repetitive strain injury in musicians than a short article can cover so I am going to focus on one in particular which I've found prevalent. This is tension in the neck and shoulders. When we're worried about performing, scared of making mistakes or over worked and stressed this often manifests physically as tightness in the shoulders. Over time this puts pressure on the nerves and tendons running down your arms and into your hands.


For many musicians with repetitive strain injury, simply removing this tension can go along way to relieving the symptoms. The first step to achieving this is to sit and relax. Focus on breathing in the tension in your shoulders and then letting it go as you breathe out. As you do this, say in your head "my shoulders are relaxed". After practicing this for a few weeks everyday, you can begin to try and maintain the relaxation as you practice. It sounds simple, but you will find a great deal of concentration is required to really focus on letting go of the tension. This process alone can be very therapeutic.

You will probably find the tension comes back soon after you've begun practicing as your attention is diverted back to playing. Don't worry. Simply stop, do the relaxation without your instrument, and then come back to it. It will take time and patience, but after a while you will begin to feel more relaxed whilst playing and start to lessen your risk of repetitive strain injury. Naturally when playing for extended periods you may find the tension begins to come back. Not to worry, as long as you learn to recognise this and act appropriately, you will be able to look after your body.

As previously mentioned, repetitive strain injury in musicians is provoked by a number of factors. This article is a brief introduction and it would be advisable to see a number of medical professionals to gain many points of view. Regardless, it is important to remain as positive and calm as possible in order to achieve recovery.

    By Andrew N Hayes
    Making music for me all boils down to the moment on stage when you're tuned in with the band and your audience to create a higher energy visit my website at www.andrewneilhayes.com to start your journey

    Article Source: EzineArticles

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

ALTO SAXOPHONE - Music-Instruments of the World

Alto Saxophone



Monday, May 8, 2017

Buying a New SAXOPHONE - Things to Consider When Buying a New Saxophone

Buying a new saxophone requires minimal knowledge of the types of saxophones available in the market as well as the differences that distinguish them from each other. Saxophones are generally categorized into four types. The first would be the soprano saxophone which is in the key of B flat. Its sound or pitch is higher compared to the other saxophones and is therefore generally considered as the hardest to play. This is not recommended to beginners who are not yet adept at playing the instrument. The second type is called the Alto Saxophone and is in the key of E flat.

Tenor Saxophone

It is the one commonly played most especially by beginners. This type of saxophone is recommended to beginners because most of the practice materials and compositions for beginners are in the alto pitch. The third one is called the tenor saxophone. It is in the key of B flat and is mostly used for playing jazz and blues as well as rock music. However, the neck of this kind of saxophone is longer than the other types of saxophone making it more prone to damage. The fourth kind is the baritone saxophone. It is usually played for jazz solos. It is the largest among the other three types of saxophone that its players will have to wear a harness to support its weight.

The person buying a new saxophone must determine first the exact purpose(s) for which the instrument is to be purchased. For instance, if one is looking at buying a new saxophone to play mostly jazz or rock music, then the best choice would be the tenor saxophone. But if the person using the instrument is a beginner and wishes to learn more about playing the instrument, then the Alto Saxophone is the best pick. Since these saxophones also come in different shapes and sizes, one who intends to use the saxophone regularly and wishes it to be more handy and manageable as opposed to heavy and sturdy will have to do away with baritone saxophone.

After delimiting one’s choice to any particular type of saxophone, the next consideration would be the price. This is very important especially if one has to work with a limited budget. Nevertheless, price consideration is also important vis a vis the market value of the instrument. One would not want to purchase an extremely cheap saxophone as it may render the quality of the instrument in doubt; neither is it wise for anyone to just rush and purchase a new instrument for a price twice its real market price. That would be a total rip off!!


Checking out the manufacturer of the saxophone may also help in ensuring that the saxophone is going to be good quality. This is especially important to ensure that one does not buy an instrument which is difficult to tune, has bad or weak tone, or is easily broken. The model of the instrument may also be helpful in buying a new saxophone. However, for students who wish only to purchase new saxophones for practice and casual playing as opposed to professionally using the instrument, being particular with the model may not be necessary. Finally, when the questions on the type of saxophone, its price, manufacturer and model have been settled it is important to make sure that the instrument is in its best condition. Check for faulty hardware, breaks, leaks, or bent parts. When all these have been observed, one may then proceed to purchase buying a new saxophone.



By Will Thompson
Buying new saxophones?
You can find them for the lowest prices available by visiting http://www.bargainsaxophones.com

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Tuesday, April 18, 2017

SAXOPHONE and its Types

Music has always been an inevitable part of human life and many of you may love to hear good music or play music for your own satisfaction and contentment. There are different types of music instruments such as saxophones, trumpets, guitar, piano that are used by people to fulfill their music love. Of these saxophones is still the most rare and appreciable music instrument by the people.

saxophone
Saxophones - Photo by kadorin 

Saxophone was invented by Adolph Sax in the 1840's and is not really an instrument but a group of instruments. Sax has invented about fourteen saxophones out of which eight still exists. However, only four of them are commonly available - the soprano, alto, tenor and baritone saxophones. Out of these, the alto saxophone is most commonly found which most people think of.

Other saxophone that still exists include E-flat soprano, B-flat soprano, E-flat alto, true tone alto, B-flat tenor, E-flat baritone, B-flat Bass and contrabass. The early saxophones were made in F and C and not E-flat and B-flat whereas others were invented but were possibly too radical to remain in the creation.

The soprano saxophone is one of the straight saxophones in the whole family because it looks like a clarinet but it is made up of brass. It can be classified as a woodwind as it is a single reed instrument. The alto saxophone is curved around and has one bend in its neck whereas the tenor has a more curved neck and is larger. The baritone's neck is a full circle and is the largest of all the saxophones. Its case is around four feet long and when it is played, it doubles the brass section.



The soprano saxophone is not a common in most of the band but it is used sometimes and when it is played, it plays a part similar to a clarinet or even as another clarinet. It has a higher sound and often doubles the higher woodwind parts.

    Olivia Andrews, writer of music-future.com is a freelance journalist and has written many reviews on subjects such as finance, education, health, entertainment, music, gifts, crafts, travel, apparels and mobile phones.

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